The Perfect Union of Pork, Beans and Rice

By BobbyRica | July 29, 2012

Chifrijo

Here’s a good question: when you’re sitting down with your friends to watch the latest basketball game or baseball game, what do you usually serve with your ice-cold beer? Bar food, of course!

Whether fried, spicy, or starchy, bar food is a necessity when getting together with your best buddies. This is a popular tradition, not only in America, but also in other countries as well, like Costa Rica. Indeed, if you go to Costa Rica, you will have a wide array of bar food dishes to choose from. However, there is one dish that stands out mainly because it was created in this South American country: the chifrijo.

Chifrijo3

The word chifrijo was coined by Miguel Angel Araya Cordero, the dish’s claimed creator. It was a combination of two words: “Chicarrones,” or fried pork rinds, and “frijoles,” which makes up the core of the dish.

Chifrijo is a famous food served as early as the 1990s. It first became popular in San Jose, and was sold in local bars and restaurants. Shortly afterwards, it began to spread through other Latin American territories. Eventually, it was registered by Cordero, who was the owner of many Costa Rican bars and restaurants. To this day, the chifrijo is the only culinary Costa Rican food invention that is patented in the Registro de la Propiedad, says Cordero.

Chifrijo is served in a unique way. First, the pork and beans are combined in a bowl with rice, and then generously topped with diced onions, cilantro, peppers, and tomatoes. After adding corn chips and a spritz of lime, the chifrijo is ready to be served.

Chifrijo4

There are many chifrijo variations that are available today, usually varying from one bar to another. However, the Cordero chain of restaurants maintains the original – if you want to taste authentic chifrijo, you will need to visit one of their restaurants. Chifrijo is usually priced at 800 colons ($1.60) to 1,300 colons (about $2.60). It depends on the restaurant and the serving size you ordered.

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